3.25.2015

Juried Art Exhibition Celebrates Library’s 50th Anniversary

Library ExhibitionVisit Albertsons Library for an art exhibition featuring works by Boise State and local artists from Boise to McCall.
Albertsons Library will present its “50th Anniversary Juried Art Exhibition” from April 2-May 3 on the second floor of the library.The exhibition will open with a reception from 4-8 p.m. on First Thursday, April 2, with awards for top works to be announced at 6 p.m.
Both the exhibition and reception are free and open to the public.
The Albertsons Library’s 50th Anniversary Juried Art Exhibition was open to all artists in the Treasure Valley and vicinity. Artists were allowed to submit up to two works each, with a total of 93 entries submitted.
Boise State jurors Lily Lee, a visual artist and assistant professor of sculpture, and Brian Wiley, visual artist and assistant professor of graphic design, selected 36 works by 27 artists for inclusion in the exhibit.
Artists whose work will be on display include:
  • Melissa S. Anderson
  • Heather Bauer
  • Nathan Brinton
  • Deana Brown
  • Tony Caprai
  • Don Collins
  • Allison Corona
  • Kolby Deagle
  • Kevin Ferney
  • Tom Finnegan
  • Maria Garth
  • Katherine Bajenova Grimmet
  • Luma Jasim
  • Lauren Kistner
  • Karl LeClair
  • Anna Matejcek
  • Robert Matejcek
  • Bonnie Peacher
  • Carrie Quinney
  • Claire Remsberg
  • Katy Rogan
  • Carl Rowe
  • Everett Marsland Smith
  • Ian Smith
  • Earle Swope
  • Erik Whittemore
  • Don Winiecki

3.20.2015

Library hours during Spring Break


The Albertsons Library will be open limited hours during the Spring Break holiday:
  • Sunday, March 22: CLOSED
  • Monday, March 23 through Friday, March 27: 8:00 am to 6 pm
  • Saturday, March 28: CLOSED
Regular semester hours resume Sunday, March 29 when we will open at 10:00 am. Library hours are posted at http://library.boisestate.edu/about/hours.php

If the sun doesn't shine that week you can always stream movies, download an eBook from our catalog, or get caught up on your research via the library's growing list of databases. Enjoy the break!

3.12.2015

New Workshops Announced: Student Talks, Raspberry Pis, MaKey MaKeys, Using 123D Catch, and more!

Albertsons Library’s staff and faculty are here to help you create, discover, learn, and innovate. 
Displaying
Using Makey Makeys to Play Drums!


The campus community has participated in some great workshops to help you learn how to use this new technology. The Discover by Doing workshops presents new topics and more workshops coming up!

In this hands on series we will provide a personalized introduction to the library’s technology and resources to help you make your ideas become a reality.

Students will also be showcasing their works, creations, and ideas in a new series called Lightning Talks. Each student will share what they have learned along the way, how they overcame obstacles, and how you can learn to use this technology as well.

New workshop titles include:
  • 3D Modelling by student Gregory Brasier - Lightning Talks Series
  • Storyboard to Screen by student Amanda Baschnagel - Lightning Talks Series
  • Viva Lowes Vegas! by student Scott Schmader - Lightning Talks Series
  • Sculpt with Sculpey Clay by student Phillip Barrera - Lightning Talks Series
  • Hands on with HTML
  • Would You Like Some Pi?
  • Getting Creative with Makey Makeys
  • Creating a 3D Digital Model Is a Snap with 123D Catch

Learn more, and register at bit.ly/discoverbydoing

If you have any suggestions, comments, questions, or idea for future workshops, please contact amyvecchione@boisestate.edu

3.09.2015

March is Women’s History Month: Rosie the Riveter

U.S. National Archives image via flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/3678696585/

Rosie the Riveter was both an icon of World War II and the American Home Front, and a product of propaganda during the war. J. Howard Miller created Rosie for a series of posters for the Westinghouse Company’s War Production Co-ordinating Committee with the image eventually becoming part of the “We Can Do It” print shown here. Rosie represented American Patriotism as many women responded to the call for war workers due to their sense of duty. She represented business because she was a symbol for production. And Rosie symbolized a skilled job, which was the means of attaining a better standard of living in America for many women and their families during the war.

For a short period of time, war jobs offered women the opportunity of improving their lives materially and building their self esteem through participation in nontraditional female jobs that contributed to the war effort. When the war ended, propaganda came into play again as business and government conspired to force women from the workforce as their jobs were given to returning soldiers.

 My grandmother, aunts and mother worked war jobs in shipyards in Stockton, California. My relatives’ work experiences mirrored those in the film:

The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter [videorecording]
Curriculum Resource Ctr -- 2nd Floor Ask for it at the CRC Desk.

Their experiences also influenced Chapter 4 on Rosie the Riveter in my thesis: Influences of the Myths of the American West on Business Culture in the United States : An Interdisciplinary Exploration http://boisestate.worldcat.org/oclc/42064361

And some day I would like to visit the Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historic Park in California http://www.nps.gov/rori/index.htm
 

Additional resources on the topic:

Rosie the Riveter : Women working on the home front in World War II (has some nice photographs) http://boisestate.worldcat.org/oclc/30894677

Rosie the Riveter revisited : Women, the war, and social change http://boisestate.worldcat.org/oclc/14967521

Creating Rosie the Riveter : Class, gender, and propaganda during World War II
http://boisestate.worldcat.org/oclc/10724692

Audrey Williams,
Access Services


3.02.2015

Find KP2, enter to win $10 Starbucks Gift card


Though KP2 has found a home away from home in the library for the past semester, he is really excited that his old friend, Terrie M. Williams, the author of
The Odyssey of KP2: An Orphan Seal and a Marine’s Biologists Fight to Save a Species, will be visiting campus on March 3, 2015. Details about her visit can be found on the Campus Read page.

KP2 continues to explore the reading material in the library. Though he’s a big fan of ocean voyage novels, like Master and Commander, he has eclectic tastes and can be found in any subject area in the library.

For the next 8 weeks, students who find KP2 will be entered into a drawing for a $10 Starbucks gift card. The drawings will be on 3/13, 3/27, 4/10, 4/24 - Winners will be notified via email, and need not be present to win.

If you find KP2, bring him to the Circulation Desk. You will receive a ticket to fill out and place in our drop box. Find him as many times as you can -- entries will remain in the box till the end of the scheduled drawings.

Good luck!

Access Services Crew



2.25.2015

Research Community Invited to Coffee and Donuts Forum - March 5th


The campus research community is invited to the monthly Coffee and Donuts forum from 9-11 a.m. March 5th, Feb. 5.

The schedule is as follows:
  • 9 – 11 a.m. Microforms area – 1st Floor
    Open forum to mingle. Support staff will be available to answer questions on data management planning, research computing and proposal development.

  • 10 – 11 a.m. Frank Church Room – 2nd Floor
    Ken Cornell, Associate Director of the Biomolecular Research Center (BRC)

    Ken Cornell will present an overview of the BRC and its comprehensive website. The BRC provides fee-for-service access to a variety of instrumentation, proposal development and manuscript preparation support, trainings, and networking opportunities.

    Dr. Cornell’s presentation will explain how researchers can utilize and replicate these services within their own units.
Coffee and Donuts is presented by the Research Computing Department, Albertsons Library and the Division of Research and Economic Development. The forum includes information on available resources and support services and is meant to allow faculty and students to visit with one another and administrative staff and establish a sense of community.

Additional Coffee and Donuts forums will be presented from 9-11 a.m. on April 2, and May 7. Each forum will highlight a specific topic, research area, or expertise. Agenda with details will be posted prior to each event.

Michelle Armstrong,
Scholarly Communications and Data Management Librarian

2.24.2015

FAIR USE WEEK February 23-27 (Part 2)

Yesterday we asked if you thought artist Shepard Fairey could claim “fair use” for his use of an Associated Press (AP) photograph for the basis of his art, the Obama “Hope” poster. The answer is rather complicated. Fairey’s case was settled confidentially out of court in 2011, so we’re not sure if he had to pay the AP for his use of their photo.

However, Fairey definitely lost a second case related to the issue. The artist plead guilty in 2012 to destroying and fabricating evidence during the first case. Fairey was not only fined, but he also had to serve probation and do community service (New York Times ArtsBeat
http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/07/shephard-fairey-is-fined-and-sentenced-to-probation-in-hope-poster-case/?_r=0).

I have to think that at some point Fairey might have been aware that he was violating copyright. Learn from Fairey’s mistakes, and check with your reference librarian if you have any questions about fair use or copyright. The Center for Media and Social Impact has just released a code of best practices for fair use in the visual arts which may also be useful (
http://cmsimpact.org/fair-use/best-practices/fair-use-visual-arts).

Elizabeth Ramsey,
Reference & Instruction Librarian